Vulturine Guinea-Fowl (Acryllium Vulturinum)Hand-drawn Pen, Ink and Watercolour Illustration.   
Fine art prints available at www.furfeathersandtails.co.uk


Vulturine guineafowl, sometimes referred to as ‘royal guineafowl’ due to their striking appearance generally inhabit the scrub and lowland forests of Central and Sub-Saharan Africa from Uganda south into Eastern Kenya in flocks of around 25 birds. They are Terrestrial or ‘land-loving’ birds and tend to run rather than fly when alarmed, only really flying to reach their roosts at night.
Vulturine guineafowl are the largest variety of guinea fowl and can grow up to around 60-70cm tall. They spend most of their time digging and foraging for food, feeding on seeds and small invertebrates, particularly insects. These guinea fowl like most, are quite vocal and can be heard making repetitive noises that have been likened to that of a squeaky cart wheel going round as they forage for food.
 A mother Vulturine guineafowl will lay a clutch of between 8-15 eggs. These eggs are often laid in a communal nest as incubating duties are sometimes shared. The egg shells themselves are particularly thick and rather than peck their way out, chicks must ‘break’ their way out of the egg when hatching.

Vulturine Guinea-Fowl (Acryllium Vulturinum)
Hand-drawn Pen, Ink and Watercolour Illustration.   

Fine art prints available at www.furfeathersandtails.co.uk

Vulturine guineafowl, sometimes referred to as ‘royal guineafowl’ due to their striking appearance generally inhabit the scrub and lowland forests of Central and Sub-Saharan Africa from Uganda south into Eastern Kenya in flocks of around 25 birds. They are Terrestrial or ‘land-loving’ birds and tend to run rather than fly when alarmed, only really flying to reach their roosts at night.

Vulturine guineafowl are the largest variety of guinea fowl and can grow up to around 60-70cm tall. They spend most of their time digging and foraging for food, feeding on seeds and small invertebrates, particularly insects. These guinea fowl like most, are quite vocal and can be heard making repetitive noises that have been likened to that of a squeaky cart wheel going round as they forage for food.

 A mother Vulturine guineafowl will lay a clutch of between 8-15 eggs. These eggs are often laid in a communal nest as incubating duties are sometimes shared. The egg shells themselves are particularly thick and rather than peck their way out, chicks must ‘break’ their way out of the egg when hatching.